Blog: Webinar

Webinar Opportunity: Family Centered Strategies in Juvenile Court

A Recording of the Family Cengtered Strategies in Juvenile Court webinar is now available.

Family Centered Strategies in Juvenile Court Featuring Members of the Reclaiming Futures National Program  Mon. Nov. 20, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM PST Register now for this November webinar featuring Jerry Stollings, a Reclaiming Futures Project Director from Williams County in Northwest Ohio; with an introduction by Reclaiming Futures National Executive Director Evan Elkin.

Collaboration in Action: Reclaiming Futures Teams Up with Pathways Transition Training Partnership to Host a Joint Webinar

Collaboration. A word we use a lot at Reclaiming Futures. Why? Because based on our fifteen years of working in jurisdictions across the country, collaboration can be an impactful catalyst for change. While the National Office puts collaboration into action regularly it was recently visibly demonstrated.

As you may know, Reclaiming Futures is part of the Regional Research Institute (RRI) at Portland State University. We are affiliated with such efforts as the National Wraparound InitiativeThe Center to Advance Racial Equity, and Pathways Transition Training Partnership (PTTP). A few months ago, Evan Elkin, Christa Myers and I began conversations with Drs. Eileen Brennan and Pauline Jivanjee of PTTP to develop a joint webinar. Both groups understand the importance of collaboration between stakeholders in juvenile justice settings to improve the health and wellness of young people with substance use and/or mental health concerns. However, our focus for the webinar did not become immediately clear. We spent time examining our commonalities to decide the best topic for diverse fields and individuals (e.g., juvenile justice; behavioral health; community members). We decided to emphasize our respective work in the area of evidence-based practices.

Next Week: A Restorative Justice Interactive Webinar Opportunity

so what is restorative justiceAccording to research conducted by The World Prison Brief, the United States has the highest prison population of any developed country in the world. The tendency to incarcerate, rather than rehabilitate, has taken its toll on our country’s most vulnerable youth. Due to increased public awareness around this issue, communities nationwide are exploring and implementing alternatives to incarceration -- as well as actively seeking to end the school-to-prison pipeline. Restorative Justice is one of the alternatives to the standard juvenile justice approach.

Upcoming Webinar: “Remove the Shackles and Help Kids Succeed”

shacklesAn upcoming Spotlight on Youth webinar: “Remove the Shackles and Help Kids Succeed” will explore the practice of shackling, why it is harmful to our young people in the juvenile justice system, and how the practice can be removed altogether.

The webinar will take place on Jan. 16 and include guests with expert insight on this topic:

  • Judge Jay D. Blitzman, First Justice-Massachusetts Juvenile Court, Middlesex Division
  • John D. Elliott, Private Attorney, Columbia, SC
  • David A. Shapiro, Campaign Manager, Campaign Against Indiscriminate Juvenile Shackling, National Juvenile Defender Center

Those that are aware of the practice have long questioned shackling in the juvenile justice system, and several counties have ongoing efforts to remove it: In Miami-Dade County, more than 20,000 youth appeared in court without shackles between 2006 and 2011—no one escaped or was harmed after shackling was removed.

Unfortunately, many are unaware that teens are often brought from detention and correctional facilities to juvenile court in leg irons, belly chains and handcuffs—before they are charged with any wrongdoing.

On this Jan. 16 episode of Spotlight on Youth, guests will describe the national movement to end the indiscriminate practice, and share their personal efforts and experiences in changing the norm for kids in juvenile court.

To listen in, visit Spotlight on Youth five minutes before the scheduled start time. Listeners are invited and encouraged to ask questions live on the air: call (347)994-1149 and push number 1 on your keypad.

When: Jan. 16, 2015

  • 3-4 p.m. Eastern
  • 2-3 p.m. Central
  • 1-2 p.m Mountain
  • 12-1 p.m. Pacific

Spotlight on Youth is a radio show that focuses on social and legal trends impacting the rights and well-being of young people. Spotlight on Youth is hosted by the Children's Law Center, Inc., a not-for-profit legal services organization dedicated to children's rights issues.

“Recruitment, Re-engagement & Re-entry: Incorporating the Youth Voice into Juvenile Justice Reform” Webinar

Teens and their families are often not included in important discussions on how to improve the juvenile justice system. Two programs with growing support are working to alleviate this void across the United States: the Raising Our Youth As Leaders Project (ROYAL) and the Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice Youth Committee (WA-PCJJ).
On Nov. 21, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice held a webinar discussing the progress and future of these programs, “Recruitment, Re-engagement & Re-entry: Incorporating the Youth Voice into Juvenile Justice Reform.
The webinar addressed the benefits, steps to engage, and challenges of including young people in juvenile justice reform efforts with the help of two knowledgeable and invested presenters:

  • Starcia Ague - Youth and Family Advocate Program Administrator, Juvenile Justice Rehabilitation Administration; Co-Chair Youth Committee, Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice
  • Debra R. Baker - Project Director, The Raising Our Youth As Leaders Project (ROYAL), King County Department of Public Defense

Important takeaways from this informative webinar include:

  • Young people representing the youth voice on juvenile justice reform serve as an effective advocacy tool and provide a perspective that moves leaders to implement change.
  • Including teens in reform efforts empowers them to become the next generation of advocates, while also developing their leadership and life skills.
  • Programs working with young people need to meet standards for organizational readiness to provide successful mentorship and support to teens involved or likely to be involved in the juvenile justice system.

For more information, watch the webinar in full:

Free Drug Facts Webinar October 29; News Roundup

Juvenile Justice Reform

  • Justice Department Pushes New Thinking on Kids and Crime (npr.org)
    Robert L. Listenbee, administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, advocates for understanding adolescent brain development to stop what experts describe as a "school-to-prison pipeline."
  • Bipartisan Support for Criminal Justice Reform (vera.org)
    The current moment of government shutdown might seem the antithesis to bipartisanship. But one area in which bipartisanship is in evidence might offer some hope: criminal justice reform.
  • Nearly Half of U.S. States Enact Juvenile Justice Reforms (jjie.org)
    A new report from the Washington-based Campaign for Youth Justice finds that nearly half of U.S. states have made great strides in the past eight years toward reducing the prosecution of juveniles in the adult criminal justice system or preventing youths from being placed in adult jails and prisons.

Young People in Recovery: Messaging and Media Training Webinars

We all know how much influence the media wields; let's use that power for the greater good!
Thanks to Faces and Voices of Recovery, young people and their family members can learn how to communicate more effectively with the media, as well as friends and family, about the reality of recovery. 
In two 90-minute webinars, trainers Justin Luke Riley, of Young People in Recovery, and Pat Taylor, of Faces and Voices of Recovery, use communications tools like human interest and media stories to reach policymakers, educate the public and recruit new members to the recovery movement.
I encourage you to take advantage of the free online training tools and watch the online webinars  to create your own strong messages and make a difference in your community.  
 
  
 

One Week From Today: Reclaiming Futures Juvenile Justice Webinar

We're only one week out from our webinar about how the Reclaiming Futures model is uniting juvenile courts, probation, adolescent substance abuse treatment, and the community for cost effective juvenile justice reform. 

Please register for a free webinar on Tuesday, April 30 at 10 a.m. (PDT)/1 p.m. (EDT)
What you'll learn:

  • Communities have a compelling need to break the cycle of drugs, alchohol and crime 
  • Reclaiming Futures is connecting young people to caring adults 
  • The six-step model is pointing to better outcomes for youth

About the presenters:

Susan Richardson is national executive director for Reclaiming Futures. Formerly, she was a senior program officer in the health care division of the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust in North Carolina, where she led a three-year effort involving the state's juvenile justice and treatment leaders to adopt the Reclaiming Futures model by juvenile courts in six North Carolina counties. She received her B.S. in Public Health, Health Policy and Administration, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Margaret Soukup is the project director for Seattle-King County Reclaiming Futures, in Seattle, Wash., where she serves as Science to Service/Workforce Development Coordinator Project/Program Manager III, Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division (MHCADSD). Margaret has a master's degree in psychology from Antioch University Seattle and a bachelor's degree in applied science, social sciences from Washington State University. 

Save the Date: Reclaiming Futures Webinar April 30

Do you want to learn how the Reclaiming Futures model is uniting juvenile courts, probation, adolescent substance abuse treatment, and the community for cost effective juvenile justice reform?

Please register for a free webinar on Tuesday, April 30 at 10 a.m. (PDT)/1 p.m. (EDT)
What you'll learn:

  • Communities have a compelling need to break the cycle of drugs, alchohol and crime 
  • Reclaiming Futures is connecting young people to caring adults 
  • The six-step model is pointing to better outcomes for youth

About the presenters:

Susan Richardson is national executive director for Reclaiming Futures. Formerly, she was a senior program officer in the health care division of the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust in North Carolina, where she led a three-year effort involving the state's juvenile justice and treatment leaders to adopt the Reclaiming Futures model by juvenile courts in six North Carolina counties. She received her B.S. in Public Health, Health Policy and Administration, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Margaret Soukup is the project director for Seattle-King County Reclaiming Futures, in Seattle, Wash., where she serves as Science to Service/Workforce Development Coordinator Project/Program Manager III, Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division (MHCADSD). Margaret has a master's degree in psychology from Antioch University Seattle and a bachelor's degree in applied science, social sciences from Washington State University. 

Interview with Michelle Muffett-Lipinski on Recovery Schools

In advance of our September 27th webinar, “Implementing Adolescent Recovery Supports & Developing Resources in Our Communities,” we sat down with Michelle Muffett-Lipinski, Principal of the Northshore Recovery High School to discuss recovery programming in schools and communities.
RECLAIMING FUTURES: What is a recovery school? How does it differ from a traditional school?
MICHELLE MUFFETT-LIPINSKI: When I speak about 'what is a Recovery High School,' I prefer to speak only about my experience creating and managing the Northshore Recovery High School. At my school, students are in all phases of adolescent recovery. All students attending Northshore Recovery High School have a DSM IV diagnosis of a substance use disorder which can include abuse or dependence or both. All students attending Northshore Recovery High School come willingly and understand they need the additional support we offer at the school to help keep them sober, make better decisions and eventually graduate high school.
Staff at NSRHS work closely with students' constituents. A typical enrolled student is involved with multiple agencies. We work closely with probation, mental and behavioral health, treatment and community supports to enhance student safety and improve positive outcomes.
We are a small community of about 70 students. We are funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and a tuition for each student from the sending school
district. At the foundation of our school is honesty, integrity, restorative practices, accountability and service. Students attend all core classes and electives as enrolled in a typical high school. However, we also facilitate daily groups, ever evolving goal setting, contracts, and on-site drug testing.
RF: What is recovery programming and how does it fit into your school’s curriculum and culture?

The Causes, Correlates and Pathways of Multi-System Youth

On July 26, 2012, I attended the OJJDP and NTTAC webinar on the causes, correlates and pathways of multi-system youth. This was the first webinar in a series on improving outcomes for multi-system involved youth who cross over between child welfare and juvenile justice.

The following take-aways are from the first portion, presented by Dr. Denise Herz:

  • Two of the most important predictors for crossing into delinquency are the number of referrals to the child welfare system and experiencing abuse persistently from early childhood into adolescence.
  • Often youth will have a previous but not current child welfare case at the time of delinquency. If youth in the juvenile justice system are found to have a prior child welfare referral, it is important to revisit the child welfare case and to ensure that there is not current maltreatment.
  • Risk factors for delinquency for those in the child welfare system include placement instability and the absence of pro-social bonds. Living in a group home has been found to increase the likelihood of delinquency compared to other types of placements.
  • Child welfare and juvenile justice can’t do this alone. They need strong support and partnerships with behavioral health treatment and education. In particular, engaging and stabilizing youth in an educational placement can provide long-term improvements.

These are my take-aways from the portion presented by John Tuell:

Recovery Month Toolkit Webinar Rescheduled to 8/16/2012

The Recovery Month Toolkit Webinar has been rescheduled to August 16, 2012, at 1:30 pm Eastern time. We apologize for any inconvenience and hope that you will join us on August 16th to discuss how best to use SAMHSA's Recovery Month Toolkit to educate your community about ways to support recovery efforts. 
-----
For the 23rd year, SAMHSA designated September Recovery Month to promote the message the prevention works, treatment is effective and people recover. This year's Recovery Month theme is "Join the Voices for Recovery: It's Worth It." The theme emphasizes the benefits of preventing and overcoming mental and/or substance use disorders and the importance of involving everyone in these efforts. 
In order to educate communities about treatment and living in recovery, SAMHSA created a Recovery Month toolkit. The toolkit provides tips for planning Recovery Month events and includes promotional and educational materials. Reclaiming Futures is excited to host a webinar featuring Ivette Torres of CSAT to discuss how you can best use the toolkit to plan your own Recovery Month events. 
Speakers include:

June 27 OJJDP Webinar: Sustaining Quality Programs

On June 27, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. E.T., the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) will present a Webinar titled, “Effective Strategies to Help Sustain Your Quality Programs.” 

0
0
1
204
1168
Prichard Communications
9
2
1370
14.0

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:"";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:12.0pt;
font-family:Cambria;
mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

This Webinar is designed for jurisdictions, organizations, and individuals who want to:
 
-leverage cross-systems communications and collaborations to sustain effective programs
-learn social marketing skills and strategies
-advocate for their programs, services, initiatives, and functions
-engage clients, funders, and champions as advocates

News Roundup: Jobs, Funding, Events and Webinars in Juvenile Justice Reform and Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment

The Reclaiming Futures news roundup today focuses on jobs, funding opportunities and events for those working in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas.
The listings below are from the new Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board. Please share it with your colleagues. It's free to browse and post! 
Jobs (with closing dates when applicable)
Mentor
HOPI Substance Abuse Prevention Center
Kykotsmovi
AZ
4/13/2012 

Books Not Bars, Oganizing Intern - Summer 2012
Ella Baker Center for Human Rights
Oakland 
CA
4/15/2012
 
Lecturer in Criminal Justice
Colorado Mesa University
Grand Junction
CO
5/4/2012
 
Juvenile Justice Consultant Title IV-E
Unificare, Ltd.
Dallas
TX
5/13/2012
President and CEO
 
Youth and Family Services Network
Bonita Springs
FL
8/15/2012

    Internet addiction linked to drug abuse and more: new roundup

    Juvenile Justice Reform

    Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment

    Registration Open for NCJFCJ Webinars on Instinctive Behavior, Traumatic Events

    The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges is hosting two free webinars that may be of interest to practitioners and juvenile justice professionals:

    • Social Cognition: The Pros and Cons of Autopilot
      February 2, 2012 at 10:30 am PT / 1:30 pm ET
      This webinar will explore the associations between information processing and one's interactions with others and how to overcome instinctive behavior and make better decisions for children and families.
      Register here: http://www.ncjfcj.org/content/view/1532/315/
    • The Truth about Trauma and Delinquency
      March 7, 2012 at 10:30 am PT / 1:30 pm ET
      This webinar will examine how traumatic events can have a long-term impact on those who experience trauma and how these events affect their families and communities.
      Register here: www.ncjfcj.org/content/view/1531/315/

    Space is very limited, so sign up today!

    Topics: No bio box, Webinar

    US Supreme Court to rule on life sentences for juveniles

    Juvenile Justice Reform

    Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment

      The National Mentoring Partnership, Global Youth Justice, and the National Partnership for Juvenile Services are conducting a survey to improve the design and delivery of mentoring services for youth at risk for delinquency, alcohol and drug abuse, truancy, and other problem behaviors.
    • Dramatic rise in substance abuse treatment admission rates from 1999-2009
      A new SAMHSA report shows that while the overall rate of substance abuse treatment admissions among those aged 12 and older in the United States has remained nearly the same from 1999 to 2009, there has been a dramatic rise (430 %) in the rate of treatment admissions for the abuse of prescription pain relievers during this period.

    12/14 WEBINAR: Above the influence

    Reclaiming Futures is hosting a free webinar on December 14, 2011, at 11 am PT (2 pm ET) on the "Above the Influence" campaign to help teens stand up to negative pressures and influences. 
    The webinar will focus on the updated “Above the Influence” campaign toolkit, provide instructions on how to implement the two new youth activities featured in the toolkit and lessons learned from Houston. It will be followed by a Q&A session.
    Featured presenters include:

    • Mark Krawczyk (Office of National Drug Control Policy)
    • Sandy Olson (Coalition of Behavioral Health Services Houston)
    • Kay Crockett (Coalition of Behavioral Health Services Houston)

    Space is limited! Register now.

    New guide helps identify youth at risk and more -- news roundup

    • OJJDP launches DMC virtual resource center
      This online forum provides Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) coordinators, state advisory group members, and other juvenile justice professionals with tools to exchange ideas, share trainings and communicate about new practice standards.
    • Treatment Center alters schedule in response to adolescent sleep data
      Because sleep can affect a teen's mood and emotional self-control, Rosecrance Health Network, the largest adolescent treatment center in Illinois, restructured their program to reduce patients’ sleep deficit. Outcomes are encouraging.
    • Update: Illinois juvenile prisons 
      Conditions in Illinois juvenile prisons are improving, according to a report by the John Howard Association on Illinois, but problems of overcrowding, lack of education and inadequate staffing linger.
    • New guide helps identify youth at risk for alcohol-related problems
      The National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has released Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth: A Practitioner’s Guide. This free tool can help healthcare professionals identify youth at risk for alcohol-related problems, counsel or advise them, and connect them to external sources of treatment. It contains a risk assessment survey and links to motivational interviewing resources.

    Pages