Blog: Funding

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

opportunityBelow you'll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance use and teen mental health areas. We encourage you to browse and to post!

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

opportunityBelow you'll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance use and teen mental health areas. We encourage you to browse and to post!

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

opportunityBelow you'll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance use and teen mental health areas. We encourage you to browse and to post!

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

opportunityBelow you'll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. We encourage you to browse and to post!

Announcing the 2015 Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Juvenile Justice Certificate Program

Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 2.03.26 PMThe Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) at Georgetown University‘s McCourt School of Public Policy has announced that the application window for the 2015 Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Juvenile Justice Certificate Program is now open through May 15, 2015.

The Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Juvenile Justice Certificate Program, held August 3-7, 2015, is an intensive training designed to support local jurisdictions in their efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in their juvenile justice systems. The program is operated jointly by the Georgetown Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and the Center for Children's Law and Policy.

The three primary goals of the certificate program are to help jurisdictions reduce:

  1. Overrepresentation of youth of color in the juvenile justice system;
  2. Disparate treatment of youth of color as compared to white youth within the juvenile justice system; and
  3. Unnecessary entry and movement deeper into the juvenile justice system for youth of color.

Through the examination of the key decision points in the juvenile justice system, the program’s curriculum provides participants a better understanding of the disparate treatment of youth of color may be experiencing as compared to white youth within the juvenile justice system.

The program will also focus on the relationship between disproportionality in the juvenile justice system and disparate treatment in other child serving systems, including child welfare and education.

After completing the program, participants will be responsible for the development of a capstone project – a set of actions each participant will design and undertake within their organization or community to initiate or continue collaborative efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in the juvenile justice system.

Visit the CJJR website where you will find further information about the program, including how to apply, tuition, and available subsidies for those with financial need. Questions can be sent to jill.adams@georgetown.edu.

Topics: Funding, Resources

Juvenile Treatment Drug Court Grant: Apply by March 17

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is accepting applications to expand and/or enhance substance abuse treatment services in existing adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts (which are the tribal version of adult drug courts) and in Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts (tribal or non-tribal) which use the treatment drug court model in order to provide alcohol and drug treatment, including the following, to defendants/offenders:

  • Recovery support services 
  • Screening
  • Assessment
  • Case management
  • Program coordination

Improve Diversion for Youth with Behavioral Health Disorders

Will yours be one of five states selected to receive expert technical assistance to help young people? You won't know if you don't apply.
Applications are being accepted for Improving Diversion Policies and Programs for Justice-Involved Youth with Behavioral Health Disorders: An Integrated Policy Academy-Action Network Initiative, made possible with support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
Selected states will convene core teams of senior-level officials at the state and local levels to implement a school-based or probation-intake diversion program for youth with behavioral health disorders. This work will emphasize:

  • Decreasing the unnecessary involvement of youth with behavioral health problems in the justice system
  • Using research-based screening and assessment practices
  • Recognizing the important role of evidence-based and trauma-informed practice and treatment
  • Increasing collaboration among stakeholders to facilitate access to community treatment and services
  • Reducing the overrepresentation of youth of color in the juvenile justice system

The full announcement and application materials are available for download at www.ncmhjj.com. Applications will be accepted through Friday, February 28, 2014. 

Call for Applicants: Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program

The US Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP) and Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) are seeking applications for funding for the Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program. The program is designed to increase public safety and improve access to effective treatment for people with mental illnesses involved with the criminal justice system by facilitating collaboration among the criminal justice, juvenile justice, mental health treatment and substance abuse systems. Each grantee is given the opportunity to tailor their programming to respond best to the particular needs of their community.
The BJA welcomes applications from local and state governments, federally recognized Indian tribes, and tribal organizations. Applicants must demonstrate that both a government agency responsible for criminal or juvenile justice activities and a mental health provider will administer the proposed project.
Applications are due by 11:59 pm ET on March 25, 2013. Apply here!

Overcoming Hurdles To Using Research in Juvenile Justice Grant Proposals

While there is a strong push for state and local juvenile justice practitioners to incorporate research into their grant proposals, many practitioners have a difficult time locating relevant evaluation studies and applying them to a specific program or policy. In many situations, an evaluation of the exact program plan implemented in the same setting with the same target population is simply not available. In addition, many high-quality juvenile justice evaluations are published in academic journals. Access to these journals can be cost-prohibitive, creating an additional barrier to the use of this research in real-world settings.
Despite these hurdles, it is almost always possible to work research and evaluation into a grant proposal. There is a substantial amount of juvenile justice-related research that is free and accessible from federal agencies such as the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS); non-profit organizations such as the National Center for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ); and state agencies such as Statistical Analysis Centers and departments of juvenile justice. Studies relevant to some aspect of your program can be used to provide grounding for your plan of action and support the likelihood that your program or policy will be a success, even if the research does not evaluate the exact policy or program plan you intend to implement.
Relevant research can be used to support the selection of program activities, the degree of change you expect to observe, the amount of time it will take for program activities to affect program youth, and the measures you will use to collect program data. It is also possible (and important!) to incorporate findings from the field for a program that is not yet considered an evidence-based practice, in order to explain and justify program logic.

Topics: Funding, No bio box

Reclaiming Futures Receives $6.15 Million to Expand in Nine New Communities

On December 10, 2012, the North Carolina Department of Public Safety announced new investments in a public-private partnership with the Duke Endowment and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust to reform the state's juvenile justice system. Together the foundations are contributing $888,000 to bring Reclaiming Futures to six additional communities in North Carolina.

On December 11, 2012, Reclaiming Futures announced a $5.27 million award from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to improve drug and alcohol treatment for teens in trouble with the law in the following communities: 

  • Lucas County, Ohio
  • Forsyth County, N.C. 
  • Duval County, Fla.

The funding will also provide training and technical assistance for the existing six federally-funded Reclaiming Futures sites in addition to these three new communities.
Reclaiming Futures brings together judges, probation officers, treatment providers, families and community members to focus on three common goals for teens: more treatment, better treatment and community connections beyond treatment, in 37 sites across 18 states.

Wisconsin Seeking Juvenile Justice Reform Recommendations

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's Juvenile Justice Commission is seeking concept papers for evidence-based and collaborative initiatives that will improve their local juvenile justice systems. Specifically, their funding priorities are:

  • Juvenile justice system improvement in the area of disproportionate minority contact
  • Juvenile justice system improvement in the area of maintaining compliance with the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act
  • Juvenile justice system improvement by enhancing capacity-building at the state and local levels
  • Juvenile justice system improvement in the area of data collections/information-sharing at the state and local levels

Examples of initiatives that may be funded include:

OJJDP Seeking Peer Reviewers

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is seeking juvenile justice experts to serve as peer reviewers for its 2013 grant applications.
From JuvJust:

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) invites practitioners with expertise in juvenile mentoring programs, youth-focused policing, and the implementation and evaluation of tribal youth initiatives to apply to serve as peer reviewers for its fiscal year 2013 discretionary grant applications.
To apply, e-mail a current résumé or curriculum vitae to OJJDPConsultantPool@usdoj.gov by November 30, 2012. Note your areas of expertise in the message body. OJJDP will compensate peer reviewers for their time and effort. OJJDP anticipates using these peer reviewers in March/April 2013.
Peer reviewers have at least 2 weeks to evaluate and rate a set number of applications and to submit their assessments electronically in the Office of Justice Programs’ Grants Management System. OJJDP will conduct a conference call in which a panel of at least three reviewers reach consensus on the merits and shortcomings of each application. OJJDP is committed to ensuring a fair and open process for awarding grants. Peer reviews, which provide an independent assessment of applications, play an important advisory role to that end.
Peer reviewers must comply with the OJP conflict of interest rules and regulations. For example, a peer reviewer cannot have a financial relationship with an organization that submitted an application under the solicitation being peer reviewed.

Most Popular Juvenile Justice Blog Posts of August

We realize that many of our readers spent at least part of August traveling and spending time away from the computer. So, we've put together a little recap of our most popular juvenile justice blog posts of August 2012.
10. A Look Back on 11 Years of Juvenile Justice Reform
Earlier this summer, the National Conference of State Legislatures published a report detailing the progress made in the juvenile justice arena at the state and national levels.
9. Funding Opportunity: Improve Outcomes for Boys of Color
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced a new call for proposals for 10 grants of up to $500,000 each. The Forward Promise initiative is looking for innovative, community-based projects working to strengthen health, education and employment outcomes for middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color.

Soros Justice Fellowships: Apply Now

Those working to advance reform and spur debates on juvenile justice issues listen up: The Open Society Foundations are looking for Justice Fellows working on the following issues:

  • Promoting just and effective sentencing practices
  • Combating the criminalization of marginalized populations, eg. people with mental illness, homeless individuals, young people
  • Ending the prosecution, sentencing and incarceration of children as adults
  • Promoting new approaches to drug policy
  • Reducing unnecessary pretrial detention

Fellows receive funding through the following two categories:

Topics: Funding, No bio box

Funding Opportunity: Improve Outcomes for Boys of Color

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation just announced a new call for proposals for 10 grants of up to $500,000 each. The Forward Promise initiative is looking for innovative, community-based projects working to strengthen health, education and employment outcomes for middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color. The projects should have preliminary evidence of impact in the following areas:

  • Alternative approaches to harsh school discipline that do not push students out of school;
  • Solutions that focus on dropout prevention and increasing middle school retention and high school graduation rates;
  • Mental health interventions that tailor approaches to boys and young men who have experienced and/or been exposed to violence and trauma; and
  • Career training programs that blend workforce and education emphases to ensure that students are college-and career-ready.

From the RFP:

Topics: Funding, No bio box

How to Find a Foundation to Support Your Cause

Lots of people, especially those starting up a new youth program, ask us how to find funding. Here's a list of ways to get started!
Before youth-serving organizations apply for funding, they have to pinpoint likely donors. How to do that with no fund raising staff and barely enough time to get your to-do list done each day?
We turned to Helen Brown, president of The Helen Brown Group, a Boston-area consulting company specializing in fundraising research, and to NCFY’s own youth policy researchers. They had the following tips for readers setting out to identify promising foundations:

  • Be focused. Be clear about your specific financial needs and identify programs that are most likely to be fundable (based on their success rates, the unique populations they serve, and so forth). Don’t chase after funds that take you away from your core mission (for instance, providing emergency shelter when your mission is to teach nutrition). But do think outside the box a bit—if you run a basketball program, could you use a grant for computers or for training volunteers?
  • Consult your board. Talk to your board and find out if they have any connections with foundation funders, even if that foundation’s guidelines don’t match the type of program you seek to fund. “You may discover hidden funding sources or a chance to speak with a foundation officer,” Brown says.

Topics: Funding, No bio box

$1.29 Million National Evaluation to Examine Juvenile Drug Courts Implementing Reclaiming Futures

New federal dollars will pay for a $1.29 million, multi-year evaluation in six juvenile drug courts implementing Reclaiming Futures, a national program that improves drug and alcohol treatment for teens in trouble with the law. This evaluation, the first of its kind, will examine the impact, processes and cost-effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Courts implementing the Reclaiming Futures model. Funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention through an interagency agreement with the Library of Congress, this evaluation will be conducted by the University of Arizona's Southwest Institute for Research on Women (SIROW).
"We know from a 2006 evaluation by the Urban Institute that Reclaiming Futures improves the lives of young people by changing the juvenile justice system for the better," says Susan Richardson, national executive director of Reclaiming Futures. "This new research will look at specific outcomes, such as recidivism, relapse rates, and costs." 

Updates from Reclaiming Futures North Carolina

It has been an exciting few months for Reclaiming Futures in North Carolina. Here are a few of the highlights:

  • Local Fellows from each of the 6 sites along with state partners from North Carolina attended the National Reclaiming Futures Leadership Institute in San Antonio. This year’s theme was “Implementing and Sustaining Change: Empowering Youth” and provided training and discussion around implementation plans, family and community engagement, and DATA, DATA, DATA.
  • The six current sites are busy with implementation planning, including how to apply learning from the Leadership Institute and developing sustainability strategies.
  • The Request for Proposal was released for the new expansion sites being funded by The Duke Endowment. We’ve been fielding questions and hosted a webinar with 33 participants from across the state on June 14th. Applications will be due July 13th.
  • Project directors, community fellows, and mentoring program representatives had the opportunity to participate in a full day session focused on best practices on mentoring. The session, facilitated by Charlotte McGuire, consultant for the National Program Office also provided an opportunity to connect the Reclaiming Futures sites with state-level contacts supporting mentoring programs for youths and families, including representatives from DJJ Community Programs, NC Families United, and Communities in Schools of North Carolina.

North Carolina Funding Opportunity: Become a Reclaiming Futures Site!

The Division of Juvenile Justice and The Duke Endowment are pleased to release this request for proposals for four additional Reclaiming Futures sites in North Carolina. With funding from The Duke Endowment, this opportunity furthers the efforts of the North Carolina Reclaiming Futures Initiative to ensure that court-involved youths are screened for substance abuse problems, connected with assessment and treatment, as necessary, and have access to long-term, community-based supports to ensure positive outcomes. To learn more about the Reclaiming Futures model, visit www.reclaimingfutures.org.

For more information on this request for proposal, a bidders’ webinar will be offered on Thursday, June 14th at 11:30 to provide additional information and answer questions. To register for the webinar, click here.

The deadline to apply is July 13, 2012 by 5:00 p.m. If you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me at jessica.jones@ncdps.gov or 919-743-8115.

Funding Opportunity: Improve Treatment for Youth Involved with the Juvenile Justice System

In case you missed it: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention are looking for communities interested in implementing the Reclaiming Futures model. And they have $1.325 million (over 4 years) in funding to give away. 
From the request for proposals:

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is pleased to announce that it is seeking applications for funding under the FY 2012 Juvenile Drug Courts/Reclaiming Futures program. This program furthers the Department’s mission by building the capacity of states, state and local courts, units of local government, and Indian tribal governments to develop and establish juvenile drug courts for substance abusing juvenile offenders.

The deadline is May 16, 2012, so apply today! We look forward to working with you!

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