Projects

Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

young woman

 

SBIRT is a public health approach for identifying, preventing and reducing harmful drug and alcohol use through a process of screening, brief intervention and referrals (as indicated). SBIRT has been implemented in settings where treatment is not typically offered or sought (e.g., primary care; education).

Reclaiming Futures version of SBIRT

With funding provided by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, Reclaiming Futures has developed its own manualized version of SBIRT designed for juvenile justice involved youth and their caregivers. It is based on the fundamentals of existing evidence-supported screening, participant feedback, and brief intervention/treatment approaches for youth and caregivers.

Our adaptation includes:

  • Increased flexibility in session frequency. This includes at least one session to a maximum of four (youth up to three; parent/guardian up to two). The Reclaiming Futures SBIRT project staff uses a structured decision making approach that includes screening, participant feedback reports, and to determine what is most feasible and appropriate services and supports for youth.
  • A highly engaging and “youth-centered” approach using Motivational Interviewing principles designed for use in non-typical settings  settings (e.g., juvenile justice).
  • Options for the brief intervention to focus on risk behaviors associated with the youth’s mental health in addition to substance use.
  • English and Spanish versions are available.

Behavioral Health RED (BH-RED)

Helping local juvenile justice jurisdictions reduce racial and ethnic disparities at key behavioral health decision points

Reclaiming Futures, in collaboration with the W. Haywood Burns Institute and Impact Justice have developed a new training and technical assistance framework aimed at helping local juvenile justice jurisdictions reduce racial and ethnic disparities at key behavioral health decision points.

This will help jurisdictions and in particular treatment diversion programs like juvenile drug treatment courts to deconstruct and measure the ways that the behavioral health decision points in juvenile justice are vulnerable to racial and ethnic biases.

The approach will begin with the way a site establishes norms and continues through the continuum of decision steps involved in the process that leads a young person into and out of treatment - or a treatment focused alternative to incarceration - after first coming to the attention of the justice system.

The continuum the approach will target proceeds from: 

  1. An examination of norms to the practice of population screening and the use of screening tools
  2. The way that treatment need and program eligibility are determined through assessment and diagnostics
  3. How we define and respond to treatment engagement ("compliance"), progress and completion

Each of these decision steps is highly subjective and can be the source of racial bias in settings like juvenile treatment court where we know that kids of color are not succeeding.

The training and TA approach helps sites realize the need to examine and measure the disproportional impact that these decision points can generate and offers a strategy to track this and take corrective action.  

Training and Technical Assistance Center (RF-TTAC)

Reducing the number of youth involved in the juvenile justice system who have behavioral health concerns

The RF-TTAC addresses the complexities and challenges of developing multi-sector teams to improve collaboration while promoting opportunities for staff training and development. Its primary goal is to reduce the number of youth involved in the juvenile justice system who have behavioral health concerns through our 6-step model.

Using a Learning Collaborative methodology, RF-TTAC takes science to service to improve the systems and services in which youth and families involved in juvenile justice interact.

The RF-TTAC provides a variety of training and technical assistance including:

  • Orientation
  • Coaching
  • Youth interventions
  • Specialized technical assistance
  • National fellowship membership
  • National meetings

For customized training and technical assistance tailored to your jurisdictional needs, contact us.

School-based model

 

Reclaiming Futures understands the importance of helping schools:

  • To develop the capacity to properly identify and support the behavioral health needs of students.
  • To see the relationship between these needs and behavior that often leads to exclusionary discipline, school-based arrest and/or referral to the courts.

We have begun integrating our public health strategies with school discipline reform efforts by partnering with schools in King County, WA and Charlotte Mecklenberg NC to implement our adapted SBIRT model in truancy and school-based arrest diversion programs.

We look forward to partnering with other school districts around the country to integrate elements of the Reclaiming Futures model with local efforts to reform outdated school discipline practices, address racial and ethnic disparities and improve schools’ capacity to identify and respond to student’s behavioral health treatment needs.

Working in tribal communities

Reclaiming Futures has begun working in tribal communities: with the Yurok community where we are developing an adaptation of our SBIRT model for tribal youth; in Northern California; and in Nebraska where we are providing training and technical assistance to help the Winnebago adopt the RF six step approach within their new crisis intervention center.  

Our tribal work is in partnership with the Center for Court Innovation in NYC and the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center Indian Child Trauma Center.

Updated: March 28 2018