Blog: Healthcare

How Ready is Your Organization for the Health Care Reform?

 

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The Supreme Court will soon decide whether to uphold The Affordable Care Act. Unless the court decides to repeal some or all of this law, widespread changes will soon take place in the healthcare arena.

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NIATx, along with research from the Accelerating Reform Initiative (ARI), developed the Health Reform Readiness Index, which helps organizations assess their organization's capacity to undertake the changes resulting from health care reform, parity legislation, state budget shortfalls, and increased performance accountability.

This index will provide you with a snapshot of how ready your organization is for change, as well as improvements that your organization might be able to make.

To access the index, please visit: http://www.niatx.net/News/NewsDetails.aspx?id=1006
 
 

 

Free iTraining: Adolescent Care Management

On the third Thursday of each month, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) hosts free iTrainings surrounding various topics affecting the addictions treatment and recovery services fields. This month's iTraining is "Adolescent Care Management--An Emerging Health Care Reform Priority".
Training info:
Thursday, June 21, 2012
2:00-3:30 pm Eastern
Hosted by: David Jefferson, MSW, Northwest Frontier ATTC 
Dept of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Study Estimates Hospitalizations for Underage Drinking Cost $755 Million Per Year

Earlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported findings showing binge drinking in the United States is a bigger problem than previously thought. Statistics show an estimated 10.8 million young people between the ages of 12-20 are current drinkers and nearly 7.2 million binge drink.
Now findings (subscription required) published today in the Journal of Adolescent Health estimate that the total cost for hospitalizations related to underage drinking is about $755 million per year.
In the study, Mayo Clinic researchers analyzed most 2008 data from Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest all-payer inpatient care database in the United States, data from the U.S. Census Bureau for 2008 to determine the incidence rate of underage drinking hospitalizations, identify geographic and demographic differences in the incidence of alcohol-related hospital admissions and calculate costs of these hospitalizations.

Nearly 1 in 3 youths will be arrested by age 23

Nearly one in three youth will be arrested for a non-traffic offense by the time they are 23 years old. 
This startling statistic comes from a new report published today in Pediatrics. According to Robert Brame, a criminologist at UNC-Charlotte and principal author of the study, "arrest is a pretty common experience."
This analysis was last done in the 1960s, when researchers found that there were 100 inmates per 100,000 people in the population. Today's study found that there are now 500 inmates per 100,000 people. Researchers suggested that rates increased due to a more aggressive policy for truancy/vandalism/underage drinking/shoplifting and because transition from adolescence to adulthood has become a longer process. 
Of particular note is the authors' decision to publish the study in a medical journal instead of a journal focused on criminologists. The researchers believe that pediatricians have a role preventing violent or unsafe behaviors in their at-risk patients, explained Prof. Brame in a HealthDay article.

Youth detention facilities are providing inadequate health care

Youth in the juvenile justice system are at high-risk for physical, mental and developmental health issues according to a new policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Adolescence. Despite this, many youths don’t receive the level of health care they need, either in the system or when they get out. The report represents the first update in 10 years to the Health Care for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System.
Nationwide 11 million juveniles were arrested in 2008, according to the report. And while not all arrested youth are placed in some form of detention (either short- or long-term) the median stay in custody in 2006 was 65 days. Eighty percent remained in detention for at least 30 days and 57 percent for at least 90 days. All of those youths require healthcare of some kind.
“We wanted to advocate for these youth to have the same level and standards of care as non-incarcerated youth in the community,” the report’s lead author, Dr. Paula Braverman, Director of Community Programs at the Cincinatti Children’s Hospital Medical Center said in an email. She said the Committee on Adolescence also “outlined specific recommendations which included the training and skill of the health care providers.”
Currently, the National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) publishes standards for care in juvenile facilities. At a minimum, the NCCHC says, youth should be screened by health care professionals immediately upon arriving at an intake facility to check for contagious conditions, urgent health needs and suicidal thoughts. Within seven days of intake, youth should be given a hands-on, comprehensive health examination by a doctor. Girls and boys are tested for sexually transmitted diseases and vaccinations are updated. A further mental health screening must be performed within 14 days. A dental examination must be performed within seven days.